Watch Gina Rodriguez bust out some expert salsa moves for a good cause with Ellen DeGeneres

Gina Rodriguez is a dream to start with, but Gina Rodriguez dancing on The Ellen DeGeneres Show to raise money for breast cancer awareness and Puerto Rico relief? It doesn’t get much better than that. 

The Jane the Virgin actress visited the set Wednesday to chat about the new season of her show, teach salsa dancing to a producer, and offer ways to support Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria. Rodriguez is one of the many voices on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s star-studded relief song, “Almost Like Praying,” which isn’t necessarily a song you can salsa to but is for a good cause.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/12/gina-rodriguez-ellen-dancing-/

Joe Biden supports Julia Louis-Dreyfus after her breast cancer announcement like only a veep could

The "veeps" got this.
Image: HBO/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock

After Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ breast cancer diagnosis announcement Thursday, former Vice President Joe Biden voiced his support to the acclaimed actress who has played a fictional vice president on HBO’s Veep.

Biden assured Louis-Dreyfus that he was there for her during her cancer fight. “We Veeps stick together,” he wrote. He included a photo from a 2014 spot the two did together before the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in 2014. Aviators are obviously involved.

Louis-Dreyfus, who plays vice president-turned-president (briefly) Selina Meyer on the show, had produced a spoof video in character with the then-real-life veep. The two had an adventurous day in the White House and bumped into Michelle Obama, Rep. Nancy Pelosi, and called former Speaker of the House John Boehner.

Julia liked Joe’s tweet, and posted her own response shortly after.

Like Biden tweeted, we’re with you, Julia.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/28/joe-biden-julia-louis-dreyfus-veep-breast-cancer/

Breast cancer study finds strong links between lifestyle choices and risk

Everything in moderation.
Image: carl court/Getty Images

Cancer experts say they’re increasingly confident that at least two lifestyle choices can affect a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer: drinking alcohol and exercising.

Just one alcoholic drink each day is enough to boost breast cancer risk, according to a comprehensive new report published Tuesday. Vigorous exercise, by contrast, can decrease the risk in both pre- and postmenopausal women.

The American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund published their joint report, which includes data on 12 million women and 260,000 cases of breast cancer gathered in nearly 120 studies.

Image: American Institute for Cancer Research

“The evidence is clear: Having a physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life, and limiting alcohol these are all steps women can take to lower their risk,” said Anne McTiernan, a lead author of the report and a cancer prevention expert at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

The study gives researchers “even greater confidence in the results,” McTiernan said in an email.

Alcohol increases risks

Tuesday’s report upholds earlier findings about the links between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk. Yet McTiernan said she was surprised to find that just one drink a day on average was enough to raise a woman’s risk.

In the U.S., a standard drink contains about 14 grams of pure alcohol, which is found in 5 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits, or 12 ounces of a 5-percent alcohol beer.

The analysis of premenopausal women included 10 large cohort studies, in which more than 4,000 women developed breast cancer. While the increase in risk for drinking an average of 10 grams of alcohol per day was relatively small about 5 percent it is still statistically significant.

Image: rob carr/Getty Images

The postmenopausal analysis included 22 large cohort studies, in which more than 35,000 women developed breast cancer. Researchers found a 9 percent increase in risk for drinking an average of 10 grams of alcohol per day, which is also statistically significant.

There are still many unknowns about how and why alcohol consumption affects breast cancer risk, Melissa Pilewskie, a surgical breast oncologist at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, said in an interview.

Pilewskie was not involved in Tuesday’s report but said its findings were consistent with a number of other studies.

She said it’s unclear whether one drink per day is the same as having a few drinks here and there throughout the week. Alcohol consumption may also be a “surrogate” for other lifestyle factors that are the real risk culprits.

Image: American institute for cancer research

Whatever the case, our drinking habits are one of the few areas of cancer risk that we can actually control, she said. Genetics, family history, age, breast density these are much greater risk factors for breast cancer, but we can’t change them.

“For women who are at increased risk [of breast cancer], this is something we think likely could make a difference, even though it may be only a moderate difference,” Pilewskie said.

Exercise decreases risks

The new report provided stronger evidence that moderate exercise can decrease the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer the most common type of breast cancer. It also revealed, for the first time, that vigorous physical exercise can decrease the risk in premenopausal women as well.

Premenopausal women who were the most active had a 17 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer, compared to those who were the least active, the report found. Postmenopausal women had a 10 percent reduction in risk.

Alice Bender, a nutritionist at the American Institute for Cancer Research, said “vigorous” activity should be sufficiently intense that it’s hard to carry on a sustained conversation. That could mean power walking, jogging, or cycling, depending on the person’s fitness level.

Bender acknowledged that exercising more and drinking less are not surefire ways to prevent cancer, just like exercising less and drinking more won’t condemn you to a diagnosis.

“There are no guarantees when it comes to cancer. We know a lot of things are out of our control,” she said. But evidence increasingly suggests that healthier lifestyle choices can “move the needle” toward cancer prevention.

Findings from Tuesday’s breast cancer report will included in the cancer institutes’ forthcoming 2017 report on diet, weight, physical activity and cancer prevention. A global panel of experts will also use the research to update the World Cancer Research Fund’s Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/05/23/breast-cancer-risk-study-alcohol-exercise/

One woman is knitting woolly boobs for breast cancer survivors

Many people’s knitting efforts focus on jumpers, scarves, children’s clothes and blankets. But, one breast cancer survivor is knitting hundreds of woolly breasts for women who’ve had mastectomies due to breast cancer.

A video about Sharon’s knitting efforts have gone viral. In the video above, which has over 18 million views, she explains why knitting breasts is so important to her.

Sharon had breast cancer five years ago and didn’t want reconstructive surgery after her mastectomy. Sharon and her team of fellow knitters who she calls “knockerettes” knit around 300 breasts a month, in an effort to provide lighter and more comfortable post-surgery protheses than the stick-ons offered by the NHS.

“My reason and purpose is to make life better for people in the throes of cancer,” Sharon says.

“Breast cancer isn’t pink and it isn’t fluffy. It’s a nasty, horrible disease that changes people’s lives,” she continues.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/03/knitted-breasts-cancer/

These lemons could help you spot the visual symptoms of breast cancer

Image: know your lemons

LONDON We might be familiar with the signs of breast cancer, but when it comes to identifying visual symptoms in our own breasts, it’s not quite so easy.

Designer Corrine Ellsworth Beaumont has launched a campaign to raise awareness of the visual signs and symptoms of breast cancer using the unlikeliest of devices lemons.

According to the NHS, lumps are the most common sign of breast cancer, but other symptoms can be seen rather than felt.

Ellsworth Beaumont has created a series of images using lemons showing things like indentations, skin sores, dimpling, bumps and redness or heat.

Image: kNOW YOUR LEMONS

According to Breast Cancer Now, visual signs can include skin dimpling or puckering, the thickening ofthe breast tissue, redness and heat, an inverted nipple, an unusual discharge and a rash or crusting.

The images from the campaign have reached 7.3 million people in three Facebook posts, according to an update posted on Facebook.

Ellsworth Beaumont’s personal connection to breast cancer prompted her initial research into the symptoms of breast cancer. “Both my grandmothers died from breast cancer. And when the second one died, I thought I should know more about cancer than I do,” explained Ellsworth Beaumont. But her research left her with more questions than she’d had before she even started.

She wanted to know what to look and feel for in a self-examination and when to get a mammogram. But she couldn’t find a leaflet or website that presented those answers in a simple and easy-to-understand format. As a designer, she wanted to visualise breast cancer awareness in an interesting and informative way.

When Ellsworth Beaumont began delving into her research, she discovered the barriers that exist when communicating with the public about breast cancer. Ellsworth Beaumont discovered that a fear of talking about breasts, the censorship of breast images, and adult illiteracy are obstacles in the dissemination of information about the visual signs of breast cancer.

Image: know your lemons

“A lot of campaigns for breast cancer use texts because using images of breasts is difficult due to censorship,” says Ellsworth Beaumont.

Ellsworth Beaumont knew she needed to find a “breast substitute” if she were to create any illustrations pertaining to breasts.

“I thought about all kinds of euphemisms jugs, melons. But I needed something that hadn’t been used before,” says Ellsworth Beaumont.

Image: know your lemons

“The lemon came up. It looks just like a breast, it even has skin and pores and a nipple. Its interior also looks like the interior anatomy of a breast,” she continued.

She spent hours in libraries and doctors’ offices learning about the signs and symptoms of the disease research that was put to use in her campaign. When Ellsworth Beaumont went along to get a mammogram, she also found out from a doctor that cancerous lumps feel hard and immovable something she feels is akin to a lemon seed.

“The lemons are a really friendly image. They’re yellow, cheerful, not like the sombre campaigns we’re used to,” says Ellsworth Beaumont.

“I think the reason why it’s gone so viral is because people can look at the images without having to read anything. In one minute people can learn all symptoms of breast cancer without feeling like they’re being educated.”

Ellsworth Beaumont hopes that people will use the images to educate themselves, share the posters with other women and donate to the campaign so that women who aren’t on social media can benefit from the images.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/01/16/lemons-visual-signs-breast-cancer/

Striking portraits of the LGBTQ community aim to raise breast cancer awareness

40 women answered the call-out to take part in the series.
Image: lisa white/supplied

A new photographic series called “Beautiful LGBTI Women” isn’t just striking to look at: It also raises awareness for an important cause.

The black and white portrait series of female-identifying members of the LGBTQ community was created by Australian photographer, Lisa White, in association with BreastScreen Victoria to encourage more women in the community to get breast cancer checks.

White, who works under the name “The Social Photographer,” reached out to the LGBTQ community directly for help finding her subjects.

“We called for 20 women to participate and had 40 women respond,” she explained to Mashable over email, adding that the women were aged 26 to 76, however most participants were over 50 years old.

Image: Lisa White

Image: Lisa White

“We decided to photograph them all,” White said. “The women who volunteered told us they loved the idea of celebrating the diversity of LGBTI women and they wanted to support BreastScreen Victoria.”

BreastScreen’s CEO Vicki Pridmore said in a statement that the photographs will assure LGBTQ women the organisation’s staff “will provide inclusive services that understand their needs.”

Image: Lisa White

Image: Lisa White

The photographs have already received a rapturous reaction online. “The participants have been posting their images on social media and have been inundated with positive responses,” said White.

Image: LIsa White

Image: Lisa White

Art that fulfils an important need, while still being beautiful enough to hang on your wall? It’s a big yes from us.

[h/t Buzzfeed]

BONUS: Being LGBTQ and Muslim

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/01/11/lgbti-portraits-breast-cancer-screening/

A breast cancer survivor is using stunning tattoos to reclaim her body

LONDON Cancer can leave survivors feeling as if their bodies are no longer their own.

After breast cancer surviver Sue Cook reached her five year remission hurdle, she wanted to do something to reclaim her body, something that would show cancer doesn’t always have to leave the last mark.

“It had always been my choice not to wear prostheses and it was also my choice not to have reconstruction,” Cook told Mashable.

“I decided the a tattoo would transform my scars into art. Now, every morning I can wake up to see a beautiful piece of body art,” said the 62-year-old art teacher from Wrightington, near Wigan.

Image: sue cook

Cook was diagnosed in 2009 with aggressive, inflammatory locally-advanced breast cancer and given a 40% chance of surviving the next five years of her life.

After consulting with her surgeon and oncologist, it was decided she would have a mastectomy to remove her right breast and therefore reduce the risk of recurrence, and she was later advised to have a mastectomy to remove her left breast.

Cook sees her tattoo as a celebration of the “new me” and her victory over cancer.

“Although a life-saving necessity, a mastectomy could be seen as something quite brutal. After all, cutting away a breast often results in women feeling less feminine. And, like any other amputation it can be seen as disfiguring,” Cook continued.

Image: sue cook

However, Cook didn’t want to put her body or mind through an extensive reconstruction process.

“I had already lived through a big enough battle, now was the time to acknowledge that fight. It could be seen as a form of vanity I suppose, but it also represents survival,” said Cook.

Cook had travelled to India with students and had loved the artwork she’d seen during the trip, particularly mandalas circular figures representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism.

“I wanted to almost recreate the feeling I used to get when I wore beautiful lace underwear. Many women will be able to relate to that feeling, it gives a boost of confidence its like a hidden secret, an inner smile,” Cook continued.

While the tattoo initially only began as a chest piece, Cook loved it so much that she wanted to extend it onto her shoulders so she could choose to show as much or as little as she liked.

“This was me making a decision for myself about my body. It is empowering and gives me a feeling of strength,” says Cook.

Image: sue cook

“To me it is a thing of beauty and every morning when I see it, its like its for the first time. It puts a smile on my face,” Cook continued.

Cook is holding an art auction to raise money for Cancer Research UK.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/10/11/breast-cancer-tattoo/

Why this U.S. fighter jet is painted bright pink

October has all but been taken over with pink to show support for breast cancer awareness with pink shirts, ribbons, food, and even famous landmarks. Now a retired U.S. fighter jet has received the pink treatment.

The USS Lexington Museum on the Bay in Corpus Christi, Texas, unveiled the F9F-8 Cougar Monday in a full coat of Heliconia “a vibrant shade of pink,” according to a museum news release. The plane is on display on the USS Lexington’s flight deck through the end of the month.

Image: USS LEXINGTON Museum on the Bay

Image: USS LEXINGTON Museum on the Bay

The aircraft saw brief combat in Vietnam in the 1970s, but otherwise it served more as a trainer craft, according to the National Aviation Museum.

USS Lexington Museum officials said the makeover is fitting for a plane once used in combat. They chose a fighter plane to support all the women (and men) fighting and surviving breast cancer.

However, some might consider a pink plane from the U.S. military a tenuous gesture in the fight against breast cancer and another example of “pinkwashing” where brands align themselves with a worthy cause with no discernible connection.

Karuna Jaggar, executive director at the San Francisco-based Breast Cancer Action organization, finds the pink plane rather ironic and a distraction. “We’re looking at tool of violence and death” to show support for women’s lives, she said. She added that auto and jet exhaust is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer.

Jaggar said she’s seen plenty of militaristic and everyday objects from handcuffs to garbage cans splashed with the ubiquitous pink. “I think year after year we think weve reached the pinnacle of absurdity,” she said. “What do we have to show for this empty awareness?”

Image: USS LEXINGTON Museum on the Bay

The Cougar is believed to be the first fighter plane to be painted pink. The symbolic paint job isn’t permanent dishwashing liquid was applied to latex paint so the plane will return to its less noticeable gray after the campaign ends.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/10/18/fighter-jet-pink-breast-cancer/

Facebook is sorry for removing this cancer awareness video

Image: CANCERFONDEN

Facebook has issued an apology for removing a Swedish video on breast cancer awareness and deeming the images offensive.

The video from Cancerfonden, the Swedish Cancer Society, showed animated figures of women with their breasts represented by pink circles, with the aim of explaining to women how to detect suspicious lumps.

Facebook later apologised for the blunder and said the images were now available:

“We’re very sorry, our team processes millions of advertising images each week, and in some instances we incorrectly prohibit ads,” a Facebook spokeswoman said in a statement to Mashable.

“This image does not violate our ad policies. We apologise for the error and have let the advertiser know we are approving their ads.”

Earlier Facebook removed the video saying the images were “offensive”. Cancerfonden said it had tried in vain to get in touch with the company.

It later wrote an open letter to Facebook explaining that the campaign “was not meant to offend.”

“We understand that you have to have rules about the content published on your platform. But you must also understand that one of our main tasks is to spread important information about cancer in this case breast cancer,” it said.

“After trying to meet your control for several days without success, we have now come up with a solution that will hopefully make you happy: Two pink squares!”

All ads on Facebook must not contain “nudity, depictions of people in explicit or suggestive positions, or activities that are overly suggestive or sexually provocative”, according to the company’s ad policy.

The ad policy is separate from the company’s community standards and Mashable understands the erroneous disapproval was related to the ads, not the content policies.

Facebook’s community standards, instead, restrict[s] some images of female breasts if they include the nipple but always allow[s] photos of women actively engaged in breastfeeding or showing breasts with post-mastectomy scarring.

Facebook came under fire last month for removing the famous “napalm girl” photo published by Norway’s largest newspaper saying it showed nudity.

It later agreed to reinstate the picture.

“Because of its status as an iconic image of historical importance, the value of permitting sharing outweighs the value of protecting the community by removal, so we have decided to reinstate the image on Facebook where we are aware it has been removed,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/facebook-breast-cancer-awareness-video/